The ORCA (Observer-Reported Communication Ability) outcome measure

The ORCA (Observer-Reported Communication Ability) outcome measure

In 2018, FAST funded Dr. Bryce Reeve of Duke University to create a novel communication measurement tool as an outcome measure assessment of caregiver observations of a child’s ability for expressive communication in nonverbal patients with complex communication needs like Angelman syndrome (AS).  We are happy to announce that not only was Dr. Reeve successful in creating such a tool, but that it is being used by others in the Angelman space. This successful partnership and strong engagement with the Angelman community allowed the development of the Observer-Reported Communication Ability (ORCA) measure to be fast-tracked (<1.5 years from conception to having a measure). 

In a FAST survey among its Facebook members, 332 parents/caregivers indicated one of the most important improvements they wanted to see in their child with AS was changes in their communication. In response, FAST made improvements in communication ability one of the key markers for effectiveness of therapies to be tested in clinical trials. However, there lacked good quality parent/caregiver-reported measures of communication ability that would provide a reliable and valid assessment for individuals with AS. Recognizing this limitation, the FAST organization partnered with the Center for Health Measurement (CHM) at Duke University School of Medicine to design and evaluate a measure with the goal to use the measure in clinical trials to detect change in communication ability over time.

As a result, CHM, in collaboration with FAST, designed the Observer-Reported Communication Ability measure with direct feedback and involvement from the AS community. FAST funded the creation of the ORCA as part of our Angelman Biomarker and Outcome Measure Initiative (ABOM) efforts.  The purpose of the ABOM initiative is to create and/or identify biomarkers and outcome measures to be used in a pre-competitive spirit, non-proprietary manner across all parties’ interest in developing therapeutics for Angelman syndrome.  One of FAST’s goals in funding Dr. Reeve’s grant was to provide this valuable tool for researchers within the Angelman space, as well as for other disorders.

The ORCA measure includes 72 questions that capture various types of expressive, receptive, and pragmatic forms of communication and is able to place each individual with AS along a continuum of communication ability that allows for examination of their changes over time. The ORCA does not rely on speech, but allows gestures, vocalizations, and use of aids to capture communication ability. It takes about 15-20 minutes for a parent/caregiver to complete the measure independently without the help of a clinician or speech language pathologist.

The ORCA measure was designed following best practice recommendations by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other organizations. First, the CHM team conducted in-depth interviews with both caregivers of individuals with AS and communication experts with experience working with individuals with AS to identify relevant types of communication behaviors. From these interviews, the CHM team learned of 22 communication concepts that were important to include on the ORCA measure such as seeking attention, requesting “more” of something (e.g., food), making choices, and greeting people. Second, the CHM team conducted additional interviews with caregivers of individuals with AS to make sure the questions included in ORCA were understandable and appropriate. Third, the CHM team collected responses to the ORCA questionnaire from 290 caregivers/parents of individuals with AS. With this data, the CHM was able to find strong evidence for both the reliability and validity of the ORCA measure to capture communication ability. All these steps are currently being written-up by the CHM team and FAST representatives and will be published in the scientific literature and shared with the FDA.

The ORCA measure is now being used in clinical trials and natural history studies for individuals with AS. Additionally, the CHM team is working to translate the English version of the ORCA into other languages so it may be used globally. Also, the ORCA measure may be used in other conditions/disorders that have significant communication deficits. 

Dr. Reeve is the Director for the Center for Health Measurement, as well as a Professor of Population Health Sciences and Pediatrics within the Duke University School of Medicine. Dr. Reeve is an internationally recognized psychometrician.  Dr. Reeve’s areas of expertise include developing patient-reported questionnaires using qualitative and quantitative methodologies and the integration of patient-reported data in research and healthcare delivery to inform decision-making. 

FAST Awards Drs. Silverman (UC-Davis) and Duis (Children’s Hospital Colorado) Grant to Study Gait as an Outcome Measure for Angelman Syndrome

FAST Awards Drs. Silverman (UC-Davis) and Duis (Children’s Hospital Colorado) Grant to Study Gait as an Outcome Measure for Angelman Syndrome

Movement disorders affect nearly all individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS), with the most common concerns being spasticity, ataxia (as observed in the majority of ambulatory individuals), tremor, and muscle weakness. Clinically, over time, individuals may develop a crouched gait which can cause a progressive decline in mobility.  Similar motor disorders are observed in Angelman syndrome rodent models; dysfunction on the rotarod and reduced activity have been consistently reported in AS rodents. Under this grant, this translational research will explore various aspects of gait across different age groups and will be assessed and compared from both a non-clinical (rodent) and clinical (human) perspective.

Current patient mobility tests such as the 6-minute walking test or the 4-stair climbing test are inaccurate, lack rigor and reproducibility because they are highly dependent on patient motivation at the time of assessment and are not granular enough to discover quality changes in gait over time. They represent a single time point evaluation in a controlled environment, where the patients must travel to be assessed. Functional assessments are often not representative of a skill set when a patient is in their own environment. In addition, there is associated anxiety in unfamiliar environments for both the patient and the caregiver. Knowing that an individual will perform most accurately in a familiar environment, utilizing a measure that can be applied in that setting is ideal.   

Current mobility tests in humans and rodents can be inaccurate, or not translatable; therefore, improved motor-based outcomes that can be assessed across species for gross motor skills, fine motor skills, and gait quality, require further dedicated research and resources. Drs. Duis and Silverman have narrowed down and developed several outcome assessments that can be utilized in parallel across both rodents and humans.  This grant focuses on various spatial and temporal aspects of gait as an outcome measure in both preclinical (rodent) and clinical (human) research models, and will assess how that changes across developmental ages.  

This study will test the production and accuracy of sensor-based technology in individuals with AS across all genetic subtypes (deletion, UPD, ICD, UBE3A mutation), as well as AS rodents in relationship to gross and fine motor markers. Dr. Duis will recruit 40 individuals with AS for the clinical half of the study.  Drs. Duis and Silverman will utilize cutting edge sensor-based technology such as DigiGATE, ActiMyo® (using wearable brace-anklets to collect a wide variety of motor metrics), gait laboratory assessments via treadmills and 3D motion, and Zeno walkway.   Drs. Silverman and Duis will also identify spatial and temporal parameters in the Ube3a mouse and the FAST Ube3a rat model.  The information developed through this grant will provide truly translational outcome measures to test therapeutics across age groups in both rodent and human, with the goal of expediating its utility for human clinical trials.

By increasing the number of relevant, innovative, in vivo functional outcome measures in our wheelhouse, we will create more opportunities for identifying and moving forward successful medical interventions where we have accurate ways to assess motor improvements over time.

FAST update on the impact of Covid-19

FAST update on the impact of Covid-19

While the world as we know it has changed, abruptly and dramatically, we at FAST want you to know that we are here and we continue to move forward in our mission to cure Angelman syndrome.

What COVID-19 precautions should parents of children with Angelman syndrome be taking?

Although individuals with Angelman syndrome are not known to be in the Center for Disease Control defined higher risk categories, the concerns about infection are always heightened in our community. In addition to the preventive measures we are all now very much aware of (washing hands, social distancing, disinfecting, etc.), here are a few resources you may find helpful:

How do school closures affect our children with Angelman syndrome?

We realize that as a community, our kids being home from school is more complicated than it is for their neurotypical peers. Most of our children with Angelman syndrome have IEPs (Individualized Educational Plans) which makes distance learning much more challenging. Without any formal training, we are now acting as educators, para-educators, therapists, social workers, and behaviorists. If you haven’t already done so, reach out to your child’s educational team to request a tele-consult for guidance on your child’s unique needs.

FAST advises all of us to take a deep breath, be kind to ourselves, be patient, and check out some of these helpful resources:

What local resources are available for support?

FAST has complied a list of potential resources for families within the United States that may be faced with hardship or are searching for local resources.

What is happening with FAST-funded research?

FAST has recently approved funding for three novel research projects and have several additional research contracts in process. We realize that the state mandated closures will most likely delay progress in the labs; however, as soon as restrictions are lifted, our researchers are ready, excited, and anxious to get back to the work of developing therapeutics to treat all individuals with Angelman syndrome. FAST will be sharing summaries of our exciting new research projects and our new caregiver support initiatives soon, so stay tuned!

What is happening with the GeneTx Biotherapeutics’ clinical trial?

Scott Stromatt, M.D., CMO of GeneTx Biotherapeutics provided the following update,

“The first group of patients in the clinical trial of GTX-102 have received their first dose. The clinical trial is proceeding as planned and we are closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic and how it might impact this clinical study. Patient safety is paramount and we are making adjustments as necessary to continue the required monitoring while reducing the burden to families where possible. The FDA has also recognized the need for flexibility for patients in clinical trials and issued a document to help companies implement changes to studies in-tended to help protect patients during this difficult time. One site is activated and treating patients, while the other six sites are in various stages of the activation process. The pandemic has slowed down the site activation process as each institution is addressing the COVID-19 pandemic in their region.”

What is happening with Ovid Therapeutic’s Angelman Trials?

Ovid clinical trials are continuing. We are closely monitoring COVID-19 and the evolving impact on families in our clinical trials. Every location where our clinical trials are being conducted faces different challenges and disruptions, so it is crucial that families and site study teams remain in close contact. Ovid is in regular contact with each site to provide guidance. In the event you lose contact with your study team, please contact Ovid and we will provide immediate support.

Currently, Ovid has two ongoing clinical trials in Angelman syndrome: The Phase 3 NEPTUNE study, and the Open-Label ELARA study. Both of these clinical trials are proceeding. The safety of every member of the Angelman community is the core focus for Ovid during this global crisis, and we plan to proceed with empathy, integrity and responsibility.

Read More

What is happening with the Angelman Natural History Trial?

As you are probably aware, all of the institutions that are involved in the ongoing Angelman Syndrome Natural History study have suspended non-urgent clinical operations, including all elective surgeries, clinic visits, and research visits, until the pandemic is under control and the physical distancing recommendations are lifted. While we hope that research visits can be conducted again from May-June 2020 onwards, no one knows when normal operations will resume at each institution.

We greatly appreciate your ongoing support of our study. The health and safety of our families is paramount, so we will not be having in-person visits until it is safe to do so again. We plan to continue with the Angelman Syndrome Natural History study by completing the questionnaires and standardized assessments that can be performed remotely via telephone calls, Skype, Zoom, or other means.

Read More

What is happening with the Freesias Study?

We understand those living with Angelman Syndrome and their loved ones may be facing a high level of uncertainty during this serious health situation. Patient safety is Roche/Genentech’s highest priority. As a company, we are taking COVID-19 seriously and are committed to keeping the communities we serve updated with any new information we learn that could help inform health decisions related to our medicines and clinical trials.

Roche/Genentech are taking the necessary cautionary measures and working to keep specific home based FREESIAS activities on-going for patients and families. However, site visits and home visits are all paused at the time.

  • What activities can continue:
    • Sleep mat
    • Sleep diary
    • Seizure diary
  • What activities have paused:
    • Site visits
    • Home visits (EEG/PSG)
    • Actigraphy around home visits

Any questions that you have around FREESIAS or how Covid-19 impacts the timeline, can be directed to your specific study site coordinator. Please stay well and healthy and we will continue to update the community and FREESIAS sites as information around Covid-19 evolves.

What is happening with the IONIS trial?

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, our main concerns are you and your health. While we continue to focus on advancing our programs which includes planning for the phase 1/2 study in Angelman Syndrome patients, we are cognizant of the strain this pandemic puts on our healthcare systems.

Ionis is carefully monitoring the situation and focused on the safety of our study participants. For patients already enrolled in clinical trials, we advise patients and families participating in our clinical studies to follow the advice provided by their clinical trial site team and abide by any guidance issued by local authorities. For our upcoming clinical trial in AS, our priority is to keep the program on track and maintain our current timeline to start the study in the fall, while maintaining the safety of everyone involved.

Read More

What about fundraising events?

Our community members that are holding grassroots fundraising events in the immediate future are evaluating, on a case by case basis, whether their event needs to be postponed or cancelled. Although promoting your CAN page during these trying times meets the social distancing criteria, we understand that fundraising is difficult due to the economic uncertainty we all currently face. We do suggest keeping your network of supporters updated, via your CAN pages, on exciting developments in the Angelman community so that when these difficult times are behind us, we can once again count on their robust support to assist us in curing Angelman syndrome. FAST is thrilled to still be receiving donations daily and as al-ways, we are extremely grateful to our community who supports us in both good times and bad.

What about the 2020 FAST Summit & Gala?

While we do not know what the future holds, we will continue to move forward with our plans to hold the 2020 FAST Summit & Gala and are praying that it is the grand celebration we will all desperately need by that time. FAST will roll out the 2020 FAST Summit & Gala Ticket Giveaway and Scholarship Applications as normally planned, making any modifications as necessary, and will keep our community up to date at every step along the way.

We do not know how long or how vast the impact of COVID-19 will be; however, be certain, that we will continue to do our best to CureAngelmanNow! We at FAST are grateful to each one of you, for raising awareness, raising funds, being there for each other and truly, being One Committed CommUNITY!

If you have additional questions that have not been addressed in this statement, please contact us at info@CureAngelman.org.

Local Resources

FAST has complied a list of potential resources for families within the United States that may be faced with hardship or are searching for local resources. The following links may be useful for finding financial support, helping with food insecurity, and other needs at this time.

The information and links provided above are for general informational purposes only. In accessing these sites, you are leaving the www.CureAngelman.org website. These links are offered only for use at your discretion. All information and links are provided in good faith; however, by providing links to other sites, FAST does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available on these sites.

FAST funds pioneering infrastructure grant

FAST funds pioneering infrastructure grant

FAST is thrilled to announce a grant to our continued partners and renowned scientists dedicated to advancing therapeutics for Angelman syndrome – David Segal, Ph.D., Jill Silverman, Ph.D., and the team at the University of California, Davis.  This grant provides the funding to build a lab devoted to Angelman syndrome (AS) research, establishing an infrastructure in which this team can evaluate multiple therapeutics simultaneously.

Dr. Jill Silverman is a behavioral neuroscientist with 18 years of training and experience focusing on preclinical rodent model systems with a strong emphasis in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disability.

Dr. David Segal is a UC Davis professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine with joint appointments in the Genome Center, the MIND Institute, and the Department of Pharmacology.  His area of expertise is in gene editing.

This funding will:

  • Create a stable infrastructure for rapid testing of potential therapeutics in AS rodent models through at least 2025
  • Train and retain staff dedicated to these studies, creating a new generation of scientists focused on AS research with combined expertise in molecular and behavioral components of AS
  • Provide lab equipment and supplies
  • Maintain AS cell lines and rodent model colonies at the University
  • Provide long term stability for this dedicated team to keep their focus on identifying and evaluating potential therapeutics for the treatment of Angelman syndrome

Drug evaluation is incredibly complex as various animal models and cell lines need to be carefully and thoroughly evaluated in order to gain accurate conclusions. This team has dedicated their careers to perfecting this task, and have become key opinion leaders in understanding Angelman syndrome specific models. Dr. Silverman has developed the experimental design, in collaboration with Dr. Segal, validated and standardized testing procedures, and will oversee all aspects of results interpretation.  Dr. Segal will direct the molecular analysis of the experiments.  They bring with them an impressive team of geneticists and researchers with vast experience in working with disease specific models. This program will allow external researchers and industry partners to have access to this wealth of expertise.

There are multiple pharmaceutical companies that have potentially promising therapeutics for the treatment of AS.  However, they do not have expertise in AS, or the specific tools necessary to properly evaluate these drugs for this population.  This infrastructure grant allows AS experts to provide those services and elucidate if a potential therapeutic warrants further development toward potential human clinical trials.

As examples, two new projects are currently being sent to this UC Davis team:

  • Evaluation of a small molecule in Angelman rodent models that was recently reported to rescue deficits in motor function and learning in an adult AS mouse model.  The lab will seek to independently validate these reports in mice and rats.
  • Screening of a new drug library in AS reporter neurons.  These compounds will be evaluated in primary neuronal cultures and carefully evaluate for paternal Ube3a gene activation.

FAST is incredibly hopeful about therapeutics already in and nearing human clinical trials.  But we are not finished until every person with Angelman syndrome sees a meaningful therapeutic benefit.  We keep pushing, and this lab with these amazing individuals will be part of what enables us to do this even more efficiently and effectively.

Neuren (NEU) – Anuncio del síndrome de Angelman


15 February 2021
Ensayo exitoso de fase 1 para el NNZ-2591 de Neuren

Después de un año de montaña rusa, un medicamento de Angelman se acerca a los pacientes

A Resaltar:

• La dosificación oral dos veces al día durante siete días fue bien tolerada en todos los niveles de dosis probados

• Sin eventos adversos graves (AAG)

• No hay hallazgos clínicamente significativos de pruebas de laboratorio de seguridad, signos vitales o pruebas cardíacas.

• Todos los eventos adversos (EA) fueron leves o moderados y se resolvieron durante el ensayo.

• Todos los sujetos completaron la dosificación, excepto un sujeto con la dosis más baja

• Los análisis de FC están en curso

• Neuren se prepara para la reunión de la FDA, las aplicaciones IND y los ensayos de fase 2

Melbourne, Australia:

 Neuren Pharmaceuticals (ASX: NEU) informó hoy que en su Fase 1 del ensayo, la dosificación oral dos veces al día de NNZ-2591 durante siete días fue segura y bien tolerada en los participantes en el ensayo. Los datos del ensayo de fase 1 formarán parte del nuevo fármaco en investigación (IND) planeado por Neuren. Las solicitudes a la Administración de Drogas y Alimentos de los EE. UU (FDA), están en preparación para los ensayos de Fase 2 para los síndromes de Phelan McDermid, Angelman y Pitt Hopkins en 2021. 

Jon Pilcher, director ejecutivo de Neuren, comentó: “Este ensayo fue la primera dosis en humanos de NNZ-2591 y estamos muy satisfechos con el resultado. La dosificación oral dos veces al día durante siete días fue segura y la tolerancia a estas dosis esperamos que estén dentro del rango terapéutico efectivo, lo que nos da confianza para administrar las dosis a los pacientes en nuestros ensayos de fase 2 planificados”.

Resultados de primera línea del ensayo:

El ensayo se realizó bajo GCP en instalaciones comerciales de ensayos clínicos en Perth y Sydney. El objetivo principal fue evaluar la seguridad y la tolerabilidad, con un objetivo secundario de evaluar los parámetros farmacocinéticos (PK). Dos tandas de doble ciego controlados con placebo en ocho voluntarios adultos sanos recibieron dosis por vía oral dos veces al día durante siete días. En cada cohorte, seis sujetos recibieron NNZ-2591 y dos sujetos recibieron placebo. Cada tanda se guió hacia la dosis objetivo, siendo la dosis objetivo en la segunda tanda el doble de la dosis objetivo que en la primera tanda. Estas dos tandas fueron precedidas por pruebas preliminares de dosis orales únicas de NNZ-2591, que permitieron el modelado de posibles regímenes de dosificación múltiples.

Se registraron los eventos adversos (EA) y se analizaron muestras de sangre para determinar los parámetros de seguridad. También se realizaron pruebas cardíacas y exámenes neurológicos. Las muestras de sangre fueron recopiladas para los análisis de FC, que están actualmente en curso. 

No se observaron eventos adversos graves (AAG). Todos los efectos adversos observados fueron leves o moderados y resueltos durante el análisis posterior. No hubo hallazgos clínicamente significativos en el laboratorio durante las pruebas a nivel de seguridad, signos vitales o pruebas cardíacas.

En las tandas de dosis de siete días, el EA más común informado fue somnolencia. En la siguiente tanda de dosis sólo uno de los EA notificados fue moderado, el resto fueron leves. Todos los sujetos completaron la dosis programada, salvo uno de los ocho sujetos en la tanda de dosis más baja, que interrumpió la administración después de recibir la primera dosis inicial después de una somnolencia moderada y descoordinación.

Sobre Neuren:

Neuren está desarrollando dos nuevas terapias farmacológicas para tratar cinco trastornos neurológicos graves que aparecen en la primera infancia, ninguno de los cuales tiene medicamentos aprobados. El principal compuesto farmacológico, trofinetida, se encuentra actualmente en un ensayo clínico de fase 3 para el síndrome de Rett y ha completado un ensayo clínico de fase 2 en el síndrome de X frágil. Ambos programas han sido designados como designación Fast Track por la Administración de Drogas y Alimentos de los Estados Unidos (FDA). Neuren ha concedido una licencia exclusiva a ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Inc. para el desarrollo y comercialización de trofinetida en Norte América, conservando todos los derechos fuera de América del Norte. 

Neuren planea iniciar los ensayos de Fase 2 de su segundo fármaco candidato, NNZ-2591, para los síndromes de Phelan, McDermid, Angelman y Pitt Hopkins en 2021.

Debido a la necesidad insatisfecha urgente, los cinco programas han recibido la designación de “medicamento huérfano” tanto en los Estados Unidos como la Unión Europea, una designación que proporciona incentivos para fomentar terapias para enfermedades raras y graves.

Contacto: Jon Pilcher, Director Ejecutivo: jpilcher@neurenpharma.com; +61438422271

Información sobre las reglas de listado de ASX:

Este anuncio fue autorizado para ser entregado a la ASX por la junta directiva de Neuren Pharmaceuticals Limited, Suite 201, 697 Burke Road, Camberwell, VIC 3124

*Declaraciones prospectivas:*

Este anuncio contiene declaraciones a futuro que están sujetas a riesgos e incertidumbres. Semejantes declaraciones implican riesgos conocidos y desconocidos y factores importantes que pueden variar los resultados reales, desempeño o logros de Neuren pudiendo ser materialmente diferentes de las declaraciones en este anuncio._

Fuente: https://www.neurenpharma.com/irm/PDF/29bba6b7-7f35-4107-9c8b-27833803e8dc/SuccessfulPhase1trialforNeuren39sNNZ2591?fbclid=IwAR0_Wx1r1uy9os9BkCOcaCtqEyVX4YYJ_UjOvIPhbftk4gUL3WYNQBY823o

Esperanza en el horizonte para el síndrome de Angelman

Esperanza en el horizonte para el síndrome de Angelman

EXQUISITE SCIENCE
15 de Febrero, 2021 Mary Parker

Después de un año de montaña rusa, un medicamento de Angelman se acerca a los pacientes

Este año trajo desafíos para muchos, pero también trajo esperanza a las personas en la comunidad del Síndrome de Angelman. Se probó un nuevo oligonucleótido antisentido (ASO) en sus primeros cinco pacientes y, en general, los pacientes mostraron una mejoría. Sin embargo, hubo algunos contratiempos.

“En las dosis iniciales, realmente no vimos nada problemático”, dijo la neuróloga Elizabeth M Berry-Kravis, una de las principales médicas del ensayo. “De hecho, en algunos de los pacientes, en realidad, tuvimos evidencia bastante sólida de mejoría desde el principio, que no esperábamos ver con las dosis bajas”.

El fármaco, llamado GTX-102, fue desarrollado por GeneTx Biotherapeutics y su organización matriz, la Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics (FAST). GeneTx fue establecido por FAST para acelerar el desarrollo de este fármaco candidato, lo que ayudó a enfocar el proceso de investigación y pruebas de seguridad. En el seminario virtual FAST del 4 de diciembre, se informaron más detalles de los primeros ensayos de medicamentos para pacientes hospitalizados

La droga, en esencia, bloquea un bloqueador. En las personas neurotípicas, la copia paterna del gen UBE3A está silenciada, lo cual está bien, ya que la copia materna puede hacer el trabajo sola. Los pacientes de Angelman no tienen una copia materna activa del gen UBE3A , pero aún tienen la copia inactiva del gen paterno. Al bloquear la inhibición de la copia paterna, GTX-102 teóricamente puede despertar el gen paterno inactivo

Después de rigurosas pruebas de seguridad y eficacia y la designación de medicamento huérfano, la designación pediátrica rara y la designación de vía rápida por parte de la FDA, GTX-102 fue aprobada para las pruebas iniciales en pacientes humanos. Solo un sitio, el Centro Médico de la Universidad Rush en Chicago, donde trabaja la Dra. Berry-Kravis, pudo abrir antes de que el COVID llegara a principios de año y, por lo tanto, todos
los pacientes recibieron la dosis allí . Después de resultados sorprendentemente prometedores con dosis más bajas, los investigadores se vieron afectados por eventos adversos graves (AAG) igualmente inesperados observados con las dosis más altas.

“Justo cuando estábamos celebrando estos hermosos resultados, tuvimos eventos adversos graves, que fue lo que llamamos una presunta polirradiculopatía inflamatoria aguda, lo que significa que las raíces nerviosas [cerca] de donde infundimos el oligonucleótido antisentido se inflamaron ”, Dijo la Dra. Berry-Kravis.

Los pacientes se vieron afectados con las dosis más altas probadas y los cinco se vieron afectados en diversos grados después de alcanzar estas dosis. Los síntomas incluían debilidad de los músculos de las piernas y, en dos casos, los pacientes perdieron temporalmente la capacidad de caminar. El estudio se detuvo tan pronto como se observaron los efectos, y tanto los médicos como los cuidadores esperaron ansiosos a que los pacientes se recuperaran. Pero incluso durante este tiempo de prueba, los pacientes
mostraron y mantuvieron una mejora en varias áreas como la capacidad para comunicarse con símbolos y palabras habladas, mejor concentración y capacidad de atención, capacidad para alimentarse de forma independiente e incluso un sueño más saludable. Se ha informado que algunos niños han hablado palabras, lo que no es típico en esta población.

“Vimos mejoras antes de ver la toxicidad”, dijo el Dr. Scott Stromatt, director médico de GeneTx. “Vimos disminuir la toxicidad, mientras que las mejoras se mantuvieron. Entonces, en mi mente, hay un umbral. El umbral de mejora y luego un umbral más alto de toxicidad “

Este tipo de SAE no se observó en estudios de seguridad anteriores. No se sabe si esto se debe a diferencias entre los modelos animales y los pacientes humanos o debido a las características del síndrome de Angelman en sí. Sin embargo, cada paciente se recuperó por completo de su SAE sin dejar de mantener los beneficios que parecía haber obtenido del fármaco.

“Es justo decir que ninguno de nosotros esperaba cuán rápido ocurrieron estas mejoras en los niños”, dijo el Dr. Stromatt. “El cerebro es mucho más plástico de lo que entendemos”.
Los síntomas de Angelman generalmente incluyen un retraso severo en el desarrollo, la falta universal del habla, convulsiones, deterioro de las habilidades motoras finas y gruesas y problemas para dormir, entre otros. Sin embargo, los pacientes suelen vivir una esperanza de vida normal y saludable. Para los padres y cuidadores, significa una vida de dependencia.

“La capacidad de atención y la capacidad de participar y comunicarse es increíblemente importante para las familias”, dijo el Dr. Stromatt. “Antes, algunas personas no respondían a su nombre, no estaban realmente comprometidas. Pero ahora juegan con sus hermanos. No juegan durante cinco minutos, sino durante una hora. O están jugando con ellos mismos. Y nunca pudieron hacer eso antes “.

Los pacientes que solían despertarse y necesitaban atención varias veces por noche ahora dormían toda la noche. Los pacientes que ni siquiera podían remar como perros con flotadores ahora nadaban sin ayuda en una piscina. Los pacientes que no hablaban de repente se acercaron a la mesa y dijeron claramente “mamá”.
Por ahora, el ensayo se está reelaborando para que la FDA lo revise. El objetivo es que los pacientes futuros comiencen con dosis bajas y se acumulen lentamente hasta una dosis máxima segura en cada intento de evitar futuros AAG. Si todo va bien, los futuros pacientes se beneficiarán de las lecciones aprendidas y de GeneTx en 2020.

Fuente: https://www.criver.com/eureka/hope-horizon-angelman-syndrome

FAST y SFARI ponen en marcha el Consejo Internacional de Investigación de Síndrome de Angelman (INSYNC-AS)

FAST y SFARI ponen en marcha el Consejo Internacional de Investigación de Síndrome de Angelman (INSYNC-AS)

Primer consejo internacional que apoya el desarrollo acelerado de fármacos para el síndrome de Angelman y trastornos del neurodesarrollo relacionados

FAST  (Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics) junto SFARI (Iniciativa de Investigación del Autismo de la Fundación Simons) anunciaron hoy una colaboración que pondrá en marcha el Consejo Internacional de Investigación del Síndrome de Angelman (INSYNC-AS). Utilizando un enfoque metodológico integrado y robusto (es decir una metodología sólida), el Consejo evaluará e impulsará iniciativas de investigación en síndrome de Angelman (SA) y otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo.

El objetivo del Consejo Internacional INSYNC-AS es construir comunidad y aprovechar las habilidades combinadas de líderes mundiales en neurociencia, investigación clínica, genética, desarrollo de fármacos, experiencia regulatoria y otros líderes de opinión, con el fin de acelerar el desarrollo de fármacos para el síndrome de Angelman y otros desórdenes genéticos relacionados. El Consejo se formó para ser un modelo innovador que fomente la investigación en áreas donde es necesario llenar vacíos. Una combinación multifuncional de habilidades y experiencia ayudará a avanzar en las estrategias de financiación de FAST, al tiempo que aprovechará estos aprendizajes para otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo.

“El surgimiento de nuevas plataformas terapéuticas, como la terapia génica y la edición genómica, ha creado oportunidades emocionantes para posibles tratamientos para trastornos del neurodesarrollo. El Consejo Internacional INSYNC-AS será una excelente manera de ayudar a la comunidad del Síndrome de Angelman a evaluar y potencialmente dirigir estas tecnologías hacia terapias”, dijo James Wilson, MD, PhD, profesor y director del Programa de Terapia Genética de Penn y del Centro de Enfermedades Huérfanas de Penn, a su vez miembro del Consejo.

Este Consejo llevará los descubrimientos científicos de vanguardia disponibles en la investigación del síndrome de Angelman al siguiente nivel. Lo hará promoviendo y haciendo crecer el trabajo que están realizando nuestros líderes de opinión actuales, mientras se avanza en estrategias que aún no se están implementando. Al compartir conocimientos y experiencia clínica, la comunidad del síndrome de Angelman puede estar segura de que, tanto para el SA como para otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo similares, los líderes mundiales están realizando un trabajo de la más alta calidad a través de iniciativas de vanguardia.

El Dr. John Spiro, director interino de SFARI, declaró: “SFARI se complace en asociarse con la Dra. Allyson Berent y toda la comunidad del síndrome de Angelman para capitalizar lo que han aprendido de sus éxitos en brindar terapias potenciales a personas con SA. SFARI espera mantener el impulso para que esos tratamientos sean aún más efectivos y duraderos, y extender las lecciones aprendidas a otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo donde la causa genética es conocida. El sentido de urgencia y el enfoque láser de FAST en trasladar los hallazgos del laboratorio hacia ensayos clínicos es una inspiración para todos los que trabajamos en este campo “.

“La inspiración para conformar el Consejo INSYNC-AS fue promover todas las vías de investigación traslacional para el síndrome de Angelman, sin dejar ningún aspecto por examinar, destacando la misión de FAST en todos los sentidos”, afirmó la Dra. Allyson Berent, directora científica de FAST. “Esto es más que emocionante para todos aquellos que viven con el síndrome de Angelman y cientos de otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo. Esta colaboración entre FAST y SFARI es simplemente espectacular para toda nuestra comunidad de SA y cientos de otros trastornos del neurodesarrollo “.

FAST:

FAST (Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics) es una organización de investigación sin fines de lucro que se enfoca singularmente en financiar la investigación que tiene la mayor promesa de tratar el síndrome de Angelman. FAST es el mayor financiador no gubernamental de investigaciones específicas de Angelman. Paula Evans, madre de una niña con síndrome de Angelman, fundó FAST en 2008. En 2017, FAST formó GeneTx Biotherapeutics para desarrollar GTX-102, y oligonucleótidos antisentido, para ensayos clínicos en humanos. Ud. puede encontrar más información en www.CureAngelman.org.

¿Qué es el Síndrome de Angelman?

El síndrome de Angelman es un trastorno neurogenético poco frecuente causado por la pérdida de la función del alelo del gen UBE3A heredado por la madre. Se estima que afecta entre 1: 12.000 a 1:20.000 personas en todo el mundo. Las personas con síndrome de Angelman tienen retrasos en el desarrollo, problemas motrices y de equilibrio, y convulsiones debilitantes. Algunos no pueden caminar y la mayoría no habla. Si bien las personas con síndrome de Angelman tienen una esperanza de vida normal, requieren atención continua y no pueden vivir de forma independiente. Actualmente no existen terapias aprobadas para el síndrome de Angelman; sin embargo, varios síntomas de este trastorno se pueden revertir en modelos animales adultos del síndrome de Angelman, lo que sugiere que la mejora de los síntomas se puede lograr potencialmente a cualquier edad.

SFARI:

La misión de SFARI es mejorar la comprensión, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de los trastornos del espectro autista mediante la financiación de investigaciones innovadoras de la más alta calidad y relevancia. Desde su lanzamiento en 2006, SFARI ha apoyado a más de 550 investigadores que realizan investigaciones relacionadas al autismo en los EE. UU. y en el extranjero. Los proyectos de investigación incluyen estudios a nivel genético, molecular, celular, de circuitos y de comportamiento, además de estudios clínicos y traslacionales.

MIEMBROS DE FAST ESPAÑA SE REUNEN CON UNIDAD MONOGRÁFICA HOSPITAL PUERTA DE HIERRO Y LA UNIDAD ENFERMEDADES MINORITARIAS PARC TAULÍ

MIEMBROS DE FAST ESPAÑA SE REUNEN CON UNIDAD MONOGRÁFICA HOSPITAL PUERTA DE HIERRO Y LA UNIDAD ENFERMEDADES MINORITARIAS PARC TAULÍ

Miembros de FAST España se han reunido con la Unidad Monográfica del Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro de Madrid y con la Unidad de enfermedades minoritarias de Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí de Sabadell Barcelona. Ambas unidades son referentes a nivel nacional para pacientes con Síndrome de Angelman

Los temas que se trataron en dichas reuniones fueron:
-Presentación de la creación de la Fundación FAST España dentro de FAST – Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics Global y sus objetivos.


-Informar del estado actual de todas las investigaciones, estudios y ensayos clínicos que se están desarrollando actualmente para el Síndrome de Angelman.


-Informar de la línea de trabajo del comité científico de FAST España invitando a los profesionales médicos de dichas unidades a formar parte y a pertenecer al comité científico.


-Solicitar asesoramiento científico, apoyo a las investigaciones en marcha a nivel global para el Síndrome de Angelman e iniciar si es posible, una línea de investigación para el proyecto de FAST España llamado “Más allá del UBE3A”.

-Establecer las bases para que tanto Hospital Puerta de Hierro como Hospital Parc Taulí sean centros desarrolladores de futuros ensayos clínicos para pacientes con Síndrome de Angelman.El resultado de las reuniones lo valoramos de forma muy positiva y esperanzadora.


Damos las gracias a estas unidades por su tiempo e implicación.
Os mantendremos informados de las respuestas oficiales.

Miembros de FAST España se han reunido con la Unidad Monográfica del Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro de Madrid y con la Unidad de enfermedades minoritarias de Corporació Sanitarària Parc Taulí de Sabadell Barcelona. Ambas unidades son referentes a nivel nacional para pacientes con Síndrome de Angelman

Los temas que se trataron en dichas reuniones fueron:
-Presentación de la creación de la Fundación FAST España dentro de FAST – Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics Global y sus objetivos.


-Informar del estado actual de todas las investigaciones, estudios y ensayos clínicos que se están desarrollando actualmente para el Síndrome de Angelman.


-Informar de la línea de trabajo del comité científico de FAST España invitando a los profesionales médicos de dichas unidades a formar parte y a pertenecer al comité científico.


-Solicitar asesoramiento científico, apoyo a las investigaciones en marcha a nivel global para el Síndrome de Angelman e iniciar si es posible, una línea de investigación para el proyecto de FAST España llamado “Más allá del UBE3A”.

-Establecer las bases para que tanto Hospital Puerta de Hierro como Hospital Parc Taulí sean centros desarrolladores de futuros ensayos clínicos para pacientes con Síndrome de Angelman.El resultado de las reuniones lo valoramos de forma muy positiva y esperanzadora.


Damos las gracias a estas unidades por su tiempo e implicación.
Os mantendremos informados de las respuestas oficiales.

VÍDEOS DE LA CUMBRE DE LA CIENCIA FAST 2020 YA ESTÁN DISPONIBLES SUBTITULADOS EN ESPAÑOL

VÍDEOS DE LA CUMBRE DE LA CIENCIA FAST 2020 YA ESTÁN DISPONIBLES SUBTITULADOS EN ESPAÑOL

Todos los vídeos de la cumbre de la ciencia FAST Gala 2020 ya están disponibles subtitulados en Español, en el canal YouTube de FAST España.

Como citó durante su presentación Allyson Berent-Weisse directora científica de FAST🇺🇲 “nos toca a las familias estar al día de la investigación del Síndrome de Angelman, intentar entender todo lo que está por llegar para tomar las mejores decisiones para nuestros hijos”.

No olvides configurar tu dispositivo móvil, tablet o PC con la opción subtítulos en YouTube para disfrutar de estos vídeos, además te animamos a suscribirte a nuestro canal.

X
X
BACK TO TOP